Go Back To Where You Belong

I often find it shamefully amusing, whenever I hear non-Aboriginals tell others of different ethnicity/race to “go back to where they come from” or “if you don’t like it, you can leave!” … hmm … and where do they actually originate from, how did they come to be in Australia? Again, that so-called convenient memory-loss they seem to suffer when it suits them or their motives.

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Don’t be too quick to ‘Recognise’

So-called “indigenous recognition” is just another political ploy—a route to assimilation and equalising of the cultures and minimising any chance of acknowledgement of Sovereignty of the Aboriginals of Australia … and of course putting the matter of the illegality of the Colonial take-over in the 1st place to rest, without consultative Treaties being in place. Aboriginal rights and legitimacy will be “dead in the water”— finally “white-washed” and watered-down, as are many so-called “Aboriginals” these days.

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Also for further reading see/read here…

Kunlangeta As Psychopathy

Psychopathy seems to be present in both Western and non-Western cultures, including those that have had minimal exposure to media portrayals of the condition. In a 1976 study anthropologist Jane M. Murphy, then at Harvard University, found that an isolated group of Yupik-speaking Inuits near the Bering Strait had a term — kunlangeta — they used to describe “a man who … repeatedly lies and cheats and steals things and … takes sexual advantage of many women—someone who does not pay attention to reprimands and who is always being brought to the elders for punishment.” When Murphy asked an Inuit what the group would typically do with a kunlangeta, he replied, “Somebody would have pushed him off the ice when nobody else was looking.”

Colins Dictionary: defn of KUNLANGETA; Inuit ~ a person who knows what to do but does not do it

Also read here

The Contagion: Wétiko Psychosis

(1) “Columbus was a wétiko. He was mentally ill or insane, the carrier of a terribly contagious psychological disease, the wétiko psychosis. The Native people he described were sane people with a healthy state of mind. Sanity or healthy normality among humans and other living creatures involves a respect for other forms of life and other individuals. I believe that is the way people have lived (and should live). The wétiko psychosis, and the problems it creates, have inspired many resistance movements and efforts at reform or revolution. Unfortunately, most of these efforts have failed because they have never diagnosed the wétiko as an insane person whose disease is extremely contagious.”

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(2) “The wétiko psychosis is a sickness of the spirit that takes people down an ugly path with no heart. They may kill, but they are not warriors. They may learn skills, but they acquire no wisdom. They may be surrounded by death but they do not, or cannot, learn its message. They chase after the riches or rewards of a transient world and delude themselves into believing that big tombs and monuments can make it permanent. Above all, the wétiko disease turns such people into werewolves and vampires, creatures of the European’s nightmare world, and creatures of the wétiko’s reality. … They have taken their Satan [evil] to the four corners of the world, and they have made him [it] their “God”.

— Jack D. Forbes, Columbus and Other Cannibals

Note: Wétiko (wet-ee-ko) is a Native American term, for cannibal in the Cree language, defining what they felt is the amoral and predatory behaviour of Europeans: that they consume others’ lands and lives by physical [spiritual] or economic enslavement.

MP calls for cuts to Aboriginal welfare

John Bowler, MP

John Bowler, MP

Independent Kalgoorlie MP John Bowler has raised the prospect of withdrawing benefits to Aboriginals as the State Government admits it has no idea how to close the growing divide between WA’s indigenous and non-indigenous communities.

Mr Bowler, whose electorate takes in Kalgoorlie-Boulder and Laverton, said years of indigenous policies had clearly failed and the Government needed to look at a “tough love” approach.

“I don’t know if that’s the answer – it may make it worse,” he said. “But what’s happening now isn’t working.”

Mr Bowler’s controversial comments fly in the face of established tradition on Aboriginal affairs and suggest a radical rewriting of indigenous policy to cut welfare and make payments conditional on work in a bid to re-energise an Aboriginal population crippled by alcoholism and despair.

It comes after Regional Development Minister Brendon Grylls said that despite money being pumped into the growing crisis, the Aboriginal situation – including alcoholism, violence and sexual abuse – was worse than ever.

Mr Bowler said Aboriginal communities had fallen into a cycle of dependency which needed to be broken if there was any hope of improvement. “There is no incentive to work,” he said.

Mr Bowler said the indigenous crisis was getting worse at a time the State was going through a boom and there was unprecedented demand for semi-skilled and non-skilled labour.

“What’s going to happen when we eventually have our cyclical turn? What happens then,” he said.

Indigenous Affairs Minister Peter Collier said he understood the approach but it had to be looked at cautiously.

“There is an appetite across the community and in a number of quarters for that sort of punitive action,” he said.

“But you’ve got to be careful that if you do do that, you’re not throwing the baby out with bathwater because what that does is create a multitude of social issues that evolve as a result of that.

“In some instances some Aboriginal people in the community will respond accordingly, but you’ve just got to be careful that you’re not creating a rod for your own back and causing a further cycle of despair, particularly in communities that don’t have access to other forms of revenue or other support material.”

Child Protection Minister Robyn McSweeney said she supported income management. She said voluntary and forced income-management was operating in the Kimberley and parts of Perth and was tied to the welfare of a person’s children. Ms McSweeney said she would like to see it expanded to Kalgoorlie and the Murchison.

~ Steve Pennells, The West Australian, 11 June 2011

Despair in shadow of riches

Nowhere in Australia is the growing divide between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals more evident than five minutes out of Kalgoorlie-Boulder, where a ramshackle camp of propped-up tin and rubbish sits next to a hole that produces 850,000 ounces – $1.2 billion worth – of gold each year.

“Welcome home,” says the sign painted on one of the tin shelters in this grim patch of third-world misery which sits in the shadow of a mammoth mound of tailings from the Superpit, the biggest open cut mine in the country.

The camp is mostly ignored by locals, as are the Aboriginals who stagger drunk through town – temporary visitors who come here via Laverton from the area known as the Lands and camp around the city.

“It’s genocide,” said Pastor Geoffrey Stokes, a big mountain of a man who isn’t prone to understatement. “Look at these conditions they let us live in.”

You just have to drive through the dingy camps around this rich Goldfields city and north to places like Laverton, where children are dumped by their parents and domestic abuse is rife, to realise that regardless of everything that has been done by successive governments, the plight of WA’s Aboriginal population is now worse than it’s ever been.

Years ago, several towns fell into an unofficial and unacknowledged form of apartheid – Aboriginals in one bar, white workers in the other – and there is a culture of resignation and acceptance about the massive levels of alcoholism and sexual abuse that is robbing a generation of Aboriginal children from any kind of decent future.

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