Go Back To Where You Belong

I often find it shamefully amusing, whenever I hear non-Aboriginals tell others of different ethnicity/race to “go back to where they come from” or “if you don’t like it, you can leave!” … hmm … and where do they actually originate from, how did they come to be in Australia? Again, that so-called convenient memory-loss they seem to suffer when it suits them or their motives.

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Don’t be too quick to ‘Recognise’

So-called “indigenous recognition” is just another political ploy—a route to assimilation and equalising of the cultures and minimising any chance of acknowledgement of Sovereignty of the Aboriginals of Australia … and of course putting the matter of the illegality of the Colonial take-over in the 1st place to rest, without consultative Treaties being in place. Aboriginal rights and legitimacy will be “dead in the water”— finally “white-washed” and watered-down, as are many so-called “Aboriginals” these days.

anti-recognise

Also for further reading see/read here…

Comment on Racism and Prejudice

Before folks start jumping-up-n-down about religious bias or racial preferences and generalised prejudices [note I did not say culture], they should be clear about their own heritage and ancestry.
Generalised and recycled discriminatory & racist points of views without personal analysis, research and substantiation, are far too common here in dear ol’ Aussie-land, unfortunately, in my opinion.
Aussies with mixed-genetic ancestry—mixed-breed mongrels, like myself—cannot [and should not] just jump into one-camp, and then start slamming-all-others, as readily or easily as someone who has less multi-racial genetics running in their “family trees”.
One should be careful not to be seen [or known] as a (racial) hypocrite, whilst slamming those they see as unworthy or lesser—based on racial differences—whilst disregarding their own racial heritage (genetics).

The White Sheep of The Family?

original title: Warren Mundine: The white sheep of the family? by Dr Gary Foley

Warren Mundine’s new “bromance” with Tony Abbott has surprised some, but not Dr Gary Foley, who has watched Mundine steadily tread a path to the Right for years.

ImageTony Abbott and Warren Mundine: a “bromance” between “kindred spirits”?

It would seem at the present time that the former National President of the ALP, Mr Warren Mundine, has momentarily eclipsed the Cape York Crusader Noel Pearson as the Aboriginal Man of the Moment.
Whilst Mr Mundine may lack the intellectual firepower of Noel Pearson, he has nevertheless elbowed his way to the front of the pack with his dazzling late-life conversion to the cause of all things Tony Abbott. Mundine’s strategic realignment to become best buddies with Abbott at the beginning of the 2013 federal election campaign may have been a surprise to some, but only those who have not been taking notice of Mundine’s mundane comments on Aboriginal matters over the past few decades.
It is therefore instructive to recall Warren’s political trajectory over the long term if we are to begin to try and make sense of the political stance he has arrived at today. We must do this if we are to ascertain when Warren is driven by pure political opportunism alone, or whether there is some internal logic and rationale to his strange political path over the years. After all, here is a man who emerged from a respected Aboriginal family on the north coast of NSW; a family who collectively over many decades have been honourably involved in the struggle for justice for our people.
At his stage I should declare my interests and advise the reader that Warren is a distant relative of mine, and that this has tempered this article to the extent that I am treading cautiously in an attempt to not offend too many members of my extended family. At the same time I believe that it is important for Aboriginal people to subject Aboriginal leaders in positions of power and influence to a level of scrutiny that a biased and ignorant mainstream media often fails to, so readers need to be aware of the tightrope I walk as I write this article. Having stated that disclaimer, I would also point out that I have long referred to Warren as the “white sheep of our family” without seeming to upset too many relatives. Continue reading “The White Sheep of The Family?”

Yeh, What Do Aboriginals Want?

July 1, 2013, my response to this article “What do these blacks want? An education? Send them back to the bush where they belong.” @ The Stringer

…I got to the part where I feel the need to say something … we cannot exclude the role of the acculturated Aboriginals themselves who have all the trappings views and beliefs, aspirations and goals of capitalistic-competitiveness as of the average mr & ms citizen, same goals, same world-view, the assimilated, who play a vital role in the game of status quo, deriding and ignorant of the “ways” they are supposed to be “guardians” of, and are either willing or subconsciously colluding participants in the deconstruction of the essence of Aboriginal society and culture, its spirituality, its “spirit” the Tjukurrpa It-Self … nowhere in the current, contemporary “leadership” is the core of the culture itself “Aboriginality is Spirituality” being spoken of or “protected”

… the rhetoric and vision is not an Aboriginal world-view … “education” is now just preparation for living in the main, it is mainstream, Anglo-Australian values, USA-corporate values, eco/ego-centred … ask them, and see what comes out of their mouths … there can be no compromise between the 2 totally opposite paradigms, world-view and way of life… a spirit-centred culture and “Way” is not an “economic centred way” one is materialism, the physical, the other sees and experiences all life in a totally different manner, a “way” of existence in cooperation with the earth and “all” that is rapidly fading from living memory …

what we have now are the remnants, the bits & pieces, the ill, the corrupted, the dis-eased, and a few left amongst us who truly know and hold dear to their essence, what the majority have lost … a dispirited, de-spirited, and dis-eased body of people and descendants … rolling down the highway of beliefs that we are supposedly creating opportunity for all …

and, as an aside… as a child and as a teenager, I lived with those people in those camps you mention, and I will never forget, ever… how much my ancestors and that side of my family and identity have been belittled and bludgeoned into no choice except join the mob, the sheeple, or die in abject poverty, the poverty of spirit … the disease of the mind and body … let’s not exempt nor excuse or overlook the “saboteurs” within our own camps, the “trustees” of the Prison Warden, the re-presenters of mainstream modern ideology and beliefs amongst Aboriginal rank & file… as the Yanks keep saying, “our way of life” meaning “their way of life” or nothing …

Assim_sm

Acknowledging Traditional Owners Sign of Respect

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner Mick Gooda has rejected the idea that acknowledging traditional owners is tokenistic, saying it is an accepted mark of respect.

Responding to references by the Federal Opposition leader Tony Abbott, on the weekend that the practice was tokenistic and paternalistic, Commissioner Gooda said such acknowledgements were a statement of fact and critical to the nation’s ongoing reconciliation process.

“The High Court of Australia in the Mabo decision recognised the fact that Australia was occupied when the British came here and that the land (and the seas) continued to be cared for, occupied, utilised and identified as the land of different tribal groups, operating in accordance with their customary laws and traditions,” Commissioner Gooda said.

“It was more than 200 years before the courts finally recognised this fact in 1992 and it, along with the National Apology to the Stolen Generations, has steered us along the reconciliation path that we are still travelling on.

“Acknowledging Traditional Owners is a contemporary and practical way of enshrining the High Court decision in Mabo,” Commissioner Gooda said. “As a nation, we have now moved beyond debating what is a self-evident truth about our history. Acknowledging Traditional Owners is a matter of respect,” Commissioner Gooda said.

Media contact: Louise McDermott on 0419 258 597 02 9284 9851

Australian Human Rights Commission, Media Release, 15 March 2010

Source: Australian Human Rights Commission, Media Release

Aunty Lilla Watson Says

Rock of Ages

“Aboriginal people believe that the spirit child comes from the earth … I haven’t seen this belief about the spirit child in any other culture, even Indigenous ones. We come from this earth; we are born from the earth. We believe that the whole of life is a spiritual experience and that we as Aboriginal people are actually more spirit than matter …

“I really believe that emotions can create chemical reactions in the body. If we don’t face those emotions, it can create sicknesses… So for Aboriginal people, the whole of life is a spiritual experience, and so the whole of sickness is a spiritual process. The spirit can not be in balance if it is out of balance with the body.

If you’re spiritually unwell, you can’t help but affect the whole of your being …See, the impact of colonialism has been huge … we Aboriginal people are spiritual people and we are still recovering because of colonialism …

There’s not a lot of understanding about the part of white Australia because they have this misguided belief that colonialism doesn’t affect them. Of course it does! It’s made them into the people they are today, which mean they cannot hear what Aboriginal people are telling them … Many are trying to run away from their own history … As they get older and more mature , hopefully they’ll have a better understanding … You see, that mouth of the snake… our people has retreated into the belly of the snake. It’s our consolidation of our Aboriginality, a renewing of our identity. Only recently have we begun emerging from the mouth of the snake with renewal and consolidation of who we are …

You see, it’s the white [non-Aboriginal] terms of reference, it’s their misinterpretations that have given definition to Aboriginal illnesses.”

~ Aunty Lilla Watson (acknowledged Aboriginal Elder, Brisbane Qld)

Aboriginal Is Not A Religion

Aboriginality re-in-forces and represents “the Law”, not the laws of Man as such,
but “the Principle” (or Law) of life and living.

We can all cite examples of the laws of government and religion — and thus of Man — and see how they have all-ways favoured the lawmakers, politicians, and religious enforcers, and thus one group against another. However, no matter how well intentioned, such laws discriminate, and in their application they usually empower the power-hungry at the further detriment and expense of the disempowered. Lawmakers, politicians and the pious as “power-brokers” make up a “triad of evil” that can be understood as all-ways saying, “these laws are for just-us” yet never ensuring nor enshrining justice. Also, such laws and teachings all-ways relate to the principles of humanism, which of their very nature cannot be inclusive of all life.

Aboriginal literally translates to the “absolute original” — the first known — below and beyond all other forms, and in the context of this country (Australia) and its original peoples (“the Aborigines”), it is not just a race or class of people, it can also refer to a state of being, a state of knowing, a Way of Living-Being — an adherence to knowing and living in a manner that maintains “ones” connection to all life — not just humans or “just-us”.
Aboriginal, in its essential implication, is not about separateness from some and acceptance to others.

The “ab origin” means “from the beginning” and trans-relates to the absolute-original-gene within the Aborigines of these lands, and in-term effectively recognises the “absolute original genesis” that is within all — the oneness, or source of beginnings of life that “links” all — “the original-gene-in-all” (genesis).

Aboriginal is the knowing of the origins and the Law of Life that is implicit in all of life, not “just-us”.

Aboriginal really cannot be interpreted logically, nor rationalised or intellectualised, no matter our need or reason to do so; It is an experience and a “knowing”, as It is original, and therefore beyond the limitations and confines of words themselves.

In my case, even though I had a “Christian” father; a Muslim Grandfather (maternal); an Anglo-Germanic Australian Grandfather (paternal); an Aboriginal-Irish Grandmother, I remain uncomfortable and “disturbed” whenever I am being imposed upon to describe who am I. I could say I am all of these and yet none of these. I could also say without confusion that I am one-of-all; an absolute original (ab-original) that is all.

In effect, in our contemporary language, “origin” means just that — the point of beginning — to which in a 3 dimensional world/reality such as ours, the coordinates or point of origin is mathematically written as 0,0,0. At that point and beyond no-thing can make sense, and being “ab-origine” cannot “make sense” either.

May I suggest that none of us stop at any particular religion; continue the search for your origene, your “aboriginality” reality — go through and beyond any religion that you may embrace to the source, to the Seed, beyond the separateness, the split, the alien-nation, and the limitations of humanism — go to the Law, the Principle, not the war of Saddam-Islam or Adam-Christian or Abraham-Judean or any “other” that binds and limits Aboriginality in this country (Australia) or within one’s Self.

Go “deeper” into, not further a-way from The Law, the “Dreaming”, the Tjukurritja Tjukurrpa; The “Dreamtime Story”.

This is my expression and understanding … for now.

Salaam in One
Djubba (David John) Akbar (27 Feb 2003)

This is an abbreviated Version of a longer Commentary I wrote some time ago. Full Version here.

Aboriginals of High Degree

“Aboriginal land rights” does not mean that the people are simply entitled to land. Nor does the term mean that the land owes anything to the people. Aborigines do not [and should not] justify land rights in terms of economy, accommodation, or possession. Rather, Aboriginal land rights represent a whole set of responsibilities, among which is the obligation to preserve the unique essence of their original law. Aborigines have the responsibility to be custodians of land, sea, and sky. They must remain accountable to the ecological world, which accepts indigenous intrusion and use of that ecology only on sound practices of interaction with the spirit of the land, manifested in strict rules of respect and protection. ~ Jim Everett: Aboriginal Writer (June 1993)

QUESTION: And if they don’t, what becomes of Aboriginality, authenticity, and cultural uniqueness?


The following is excerpted from Aboriginal Men of High Degree by AP Elkin (1977, 1994).

¯¯¯

…the magical substances on which the doctor’s power depends are called maban, the term used across the desert at the Warburton Ranges and down to Ooldea. …the medicine man is made by, or receives his power from, the Rainbow Serpent, or else a water snake, which can also be seen in the sky.

…this mythical snake makes the doctor, killing him being the first step in the process. … He then inserts in him maban (quartz crystals) and little rainbow snakes…

The powers of medicine men are supernormal, usually supersensory, and are derived from two sources: first, the cult-heroes of the craft—sky and totemic heroes, spirits and ghosts, who may be all one; second, the long line and hierarchy or order of medicine men, which leads back to these same heroes of the eternal dreamtime. …

Medicine men’s powers enable them to do many supernormal things, but they are all psychical in character. Healing or killing (by sorcery), “divining” a murderer, practicing hypnotism, telepathy, telesthesia, and clairvoyance, holding séances or visiting the sky—all these depend on the psychic training and faculties of the medicine man and the induction of the right state of receptivity (aka acceptivity) in the mind of the patient, victim, mourners, dreamers, or audience at a ceremony. … Continue reading “Aboriginals of High Degree”

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