Tag Archives: indigenous

It Just Is Mamu, Evil

Corruption is a form of corrosion, corrosion or corrupted spirit/energy within is as a disease, a virus, that spreads or not throughout the system within and infected, affecting those around. When the inner sheath has been torn, ripped, traumatised, its as if like the vacuum in a pressurised cabin has been breached, and an opening within the inner psyche—spiritual immune system—is disabled, damage. The corruption and corrosive disease I speak of is like the wind, we see its effects and the damage chaotic winds can produce, but we never see the wind … evil is like the wind of darkness, viral bacteria to the spirit/soul, integrity of the individual … the Aboriginal people I grew with have their word for evil/bad… mamu!

And if they recognised as such way back when, then why the heck do moderners think/believe that such “evil” no longer exists? We live in a corrupt system, paradigm … and many many are “diseased” and “corrupted” by such environmental association and other “carriers”, just like a disease or pandemic.

Sovereignty is not Constitutional Recognition

Anyone claiming or identifying as Aboriginal should at least learn the difference between Sovereignty rights & so-called Reconciliation and/or Recognition … and if you don’t know the fundamental differences and its impact on the future standing of Aborigines in this country … then STFU, and stop following what’s trendy… there are a lot of “5 Star blacks” (coconuts) working with the Govt agenda to dis-empower the Aboriginal nations even further … to be “white-washed” and assimilated once and for all under the current goal of Constitutional recognition … read and learn people, or just move on and forget Aboriginal world and culture …

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Read further here… Governments attempting to counter Sovereignty Movement: Understanding when we are winning!

or alternatively, see/read this( PDF)… Governments try to counter Sovereignty Movement

 

About Letters Patent re Sth Australia

The result of a long campaign by those who wished to establish a colony according to the principles of systematic colonisation, the South Australia Act of 1834 empowered the King to erect South Australia into one or more British Provinces, and to provide for its colonisation and government.  The preamble to the Act included a description of the lands on which such Provinces were to be erected as ‘waste and unoccupied Lands, which are supposed to be fit for the Purposes of Colonization’.

A period of intense negotiation followed between those planning to establish the Province of South Australia and the Colonial Office, which administered Britain’s colonies.  One of the topics under discussion was provisions for the Aboriginal inhabitants, particularly in relation to their proprietary rights to land, rights which those in the Colonial Office believed were beyond dispute. The Colonization Commissioners, seeking to establish the Province, disputed that such rights would be found to exist, believing that Aboriginal people did not ‘occupy’ the land in a way that would be recognised by British institutions.GRG2_64_0_1_1_img001

Negotiations between the Commissioners and the Colonial Office continued. Finally, when the Letters Patent establishing the Province were signed on 19 February, 1836, they included the clause:

Provided always, that nothing in these our letters patent contained shall affect or be construed to affect the rights of any Aboriginal Natives of the said Province to the actual occupation or enjoyment in their own Persons or in the Persons of their Descendants of any Lands therein now actually occupied or enjoyed by such Natives.

The first of the South Australian Company’s ships, the John Pirie, set sail for South Australia just three days later.

In 1838 the South Australia Act was amended, and wording conforming to (and referring to) the Letters Patent was inserted.

Colonisation of the new province of South Australia proceeded with little regard for the words of the Letters Patent relating to Aboriginal rights to land. In 2011, the Letters Patent are again the source of discussion and controversy as the significance and legal meaning of the document are debated.

Source: Bound For South Australia

 Also view…

The Contagion: Wétiko Psychosis

(1) “Columbus was a wétiko. He was mentally ill or insane, the carrier of a terribly contagious psychological disease, the wétiko psychosis. The Native people he described were sane people with a healthy state of mind. Sanity or healthy normality among humans and other living creatures involves a respect for other forms of life and other individuals. I believe that is the way people have lived (and should live). The wétiko psychosis, and the problems it creates, have inspired many resistance movements and efforts at reform or revolution. Unfortunately, most of these efforts have failed because they have never diagnosed the wétiko as an insane person whose disease is extremely contagious.”

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(2) “The wétiko psychosis is a sickness of the spirit that takes people down an ugly path with no heart. They may kill, but they are not warriors. They may learn skills, but they acquire no wisdom. They may be surrounded by death but they do not, or cannot, learn its message. They chase after the riches or rewards of a transient world and delude themselves into believing that big tombs and monuments can make it permanent. Above all, the wétiko disease turns such people into werewolves and vampires, creatures of the European’s nightmare world, and creatures of the wétiko’s reality. … They have taken their Satan [evil] to the four corners of the world, and they have made him [it] their “God”.

— Jack D. Forbes, Columbus and Other Cannibals

Note: Wétiko (wet-ee-ko) is a Native American term, for cannibal in the Cree language, defining what they felt is the amoral and predatory behaviour of Europeans: that they consume others’ lands and lives by physical [spiritual] or economic enslavement.

The White Sheep of The Family?

original title: Warren Mundine: The white sheep of the family? by Dr Gary Foley

Warren Mundine’s new “bromance” with Tony Abbott has surprised some, but not Dr Gary Foley, who has watched Mundine steadily tread a path to the Right for years.

ImageTony Abbott and Warren Mundine: a “bromance” between “kindred spirits”?

It would seem at the present time that the former National President of the ALP, Mr Warren Mundine, has momentarily eclipsed the Cape York Crusader Noel Pearson as the Aboriginal Man of the Moment.
Whilst Mr Mundine may lack the intellectual firepower of Noel Pearson, he has nevertheless elbowed his way to the front of the pack with his dazzling late-life conversion to the cause of all things Tony Abbott. Mundine’s strategic realignment to become best buddies with Abbott at the beginning of the 2013 federal election campaign may have been a surprise to some, but only those who have not been taking notice of Mundine’s mundane comments on Aboriginal matters over the past few decades.
It is therefore instructive to recall Warren’s political trajectory over the long term if we are to begin to try and make sense of the political stance he has arrived at today. We must do this if we are to ascertain when Warren is driven by pure political opportunism alone, or whether there is some internal logic and rationale to his strange political path over the years. After all, here is a man who emerged from a respected Aboriginal family on the north coast of NSW; a family who collectively over many decades have been honourably involved in the struggle for justice for our people.
At his stage I should declare my interests and advise the reader that Warren is a distant relative of mine, and that this has tempered this article to the extent that I am treading cautiously in an attempt to not offend too many members of my extended family. At the same time I believe that it is important for Aboriginal people to subject Aboriginal leaders in positions of power and influence to a level of scrutiny that a biased and ignorant mainstream media often fails to, so readers need to be aware of the tightrope I walk as I write this article. Having stated that disclaimer, I would also point out that I have long referred to Warren as the “white sheep of our family” without seeming to upset too many relatives. Continue reading The White Sheep of The Family?

Yeh, What Do Aboriginals Want?

July 1, 2013, my response to this article “What do these blacks want? An education? Send them back to the bush where they belong.” @ The Stringer

…I got to the part where I feel the need to say something … we cannot exclude the role of the acculturated Aboriginals themselves who have all the trappings views and beliefs, aspirations and goals of capitalistic-competitiveness as of the average mr & ms citizen, same goals, same world-view, the assimilated, who play a vital role in the game of status quo, deriding and ignorant of the “ways” they are supposed to be “guardians” of, and are either willing or subconsciously colluding participants in the deconstruction of the essence of Aboriginal society and culture, its spirituality, its “spirit” the Tjukurrpa It-Self … nowhere in the current, contemporary “leadership” is the core of the culture itself “Aboriginality is Spirituality” being spoken of or “protected”

… the rhetoric and vision is not an Aboriginal world-view … “education” is now just preparation for living in the main, it is mainstream, Anglo-Australian values, USA-corporate values, eco/ego-centred … ask them, and see what comes out of their mouths … there can be no compromise between the 2 totally opposite paradigms, world-view and way of life… a spirit-centred culture and “Way” is not an “economic centred way” one is materialism, the physical, the other sees and experiences all life in a totally different manner, a “way” of existence in cooperation with the earth and “all” that is rapidly fading from living memory …

what we have now are the remnants, the bits & pieces, the ill, the corrupted, the dis-eased, and a few left amongst us who truly know and hold dear to their essence, what the majority have lost … a dispirited, de-spirited, and dis-eased body of people and descendants … rolling down the highway of beliefs that we are supposedly creating opportunity for all …

and, as an aside… as a child and as a teenager, I lived with those people in those camps you mention, and I will never forget, ever… how much my ancestors and that side of my family and identity have been belittled and bludgeoned into no choice except join the mob, the sheeple, or die in abject poverty, the poverty of spirit … the disease of the mind and body … let’s not exempt nor excuse or overlook the “saboteurs” within our own camps, the “trustees” of the Prison Warden, the re-presenters of mainstream modern ideology and beliefs amongst Aboriginal rank & file… as the Yanks keep saying, “our way of life” meaning “their way of life” or nothing …

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Cultural Respect, maybe

“The term ‘cultural respect’ refers to the recognition, protection and continued advancement of the inherent rights, cultures and traditions of Aboriginal people. Cultural respect is achieved when cultural differences are respected.”

Source: Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (2004): Cultural Respect Framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health 2004-2009 p. 7

IMO: It’s a pity that many in the Aboriginal affairs arena, know the talk, but rarely, if at all put it into practise!